Why Regulation Should be Part of Cryptocurrencies’ Future

By Barry Goodman & Oliver Wiehann

June 23, 2021

Despite a recent embrace by the capital markets and financial corporations, digital assets and cryptocurrencies are still not at the point of widespread, global adoption. To get there, lawmakers and financial agencies should implement rules and regulations to protect consumers and enable the space to develop further as an alternative financial system.

The evolution of digital assets like cryptocurrencies has a phenomenal potential to change the financial industry. However, it also creates challenges. Digital assets are decentralized and do not rely on either governmental authorities or financial institutions to create, transmit or determine the value of a cryptocurrency. Supply is determined by a computer code; prices can be extremely volatile. Over the past decade we have witnessed digital asset exchanges being closed down due to fraud, failure or security breaches.

Within the United States, there is no uniformity in the regulatory framework with respect to how businesses that deal in digital assets should conduct themselves. New York is one of the few states that has a functional regulatory regime through the New York State Department of Financial Services. Meeting compliance in New York has become a badge of legitimacy. However, there are also a significant number of companies that have chosen not to operate in New York due to these regulations. On the other hand, Wyoming has adopted a lighter regulatory framework and is widely considered the most crypto-friendly jurisdiction in the United States.

Congressional Developments
In April, the U.S. House of Representatives passed “The Eliminate Barriers to Innovation Act,” a bill that directs the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to establish a digital asset working group and open new regulatory frameworks for both digital assets and cryptocurrencies.

The bipartisan bill would initiate the commission of a specialized working group that would evaluate regulation of digital assets in the U.S. The joint working group would include the SEC and CFTC, in collaboration with financial technology firms, financial firms, academic institutions, small and medium businesses that leverage financial technology and investor protection groups, as well as business or non-profit entities that are working to support historically underserved businesses. The working group would draft recommendations to improve the current regulatory landscape in the U.S., which will then be extended internationally where possible. The working group will be given a year to evaluate and provide technical documentation on how these recommendations should be implemented through compliance frameworks.

Regulation Ensures Market Stability
While some people believe that cryptocurrencies should operate completely independently from any form of regulation, publicly accountable businesses are vigorously regulated in order to protect consumers and economic stability. Independent audits are similarly required to protect the interests of all stakeholders, ensure that the applicable laws and regulations are adhered to and that the financial statements are free from material misstatement, as well as fraud (to a certain extent).

Regulators around the world regularly warn crypto asset investors to be extremely cautious and vigilant, partially due to a lack of regulation, which creates an opportunity for fraudsters to prey on uninformed investors. Fraud and error can usually be mitigated by prevention, detection, and recourse. Introducing regulations to govern the cryptocurrency industry will mean preventative measures are in place to ensure fraud doesn’t occur and that there is appropriate legal recourse for victims. There is also a significant role for auditors in detecting possible instances of fraud or error, as well as assisting with the recourse process.

Digital Asset Outlook
Mazars will be keeping a close watch on the progress of the innovation bill. We believe positive regulatory changes are ahead. Gary Gensler, the recently confirmed head of the SEC, has a keen knowledge of, and appreciation for, the applicability of digital assets in the global financial services ecosystem. Gensler is the former head of the CFTC, as well as a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management where he researched and taught blockchain technology, digital currencies and financial technology.

In a recent interview with CNBC, Chair Gensler said there needed to be authority for a regulator to oversee the crypto exchanges, similar to the equity and futures markets. He said many crypto coins were trading like assets and should fall under the purview of the SEC.

We welcome this level of engagement and improved regulation, which will be good for the industry, investors, consumers and society at large. Without regulation, cryptocurrencies are unlikely to become a standard part of investment portfolios due to the current high level of risk.

The information provided here is for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation.  This article originally appeared in Bank Director.

 

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Disclaimer of Liability

The information provided here is for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation.

Mazars USA LLP is an independent member firm of Mazars Group.


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